Tag Archives: Glacier Park

The Best Hidden Gems in Glacier National Park

When I think of Glacier National Park, the first thing that comes to mind is the Going-to-the-Sun Road. After all, the 50 miles of this two-lane highway takes travelers to some of the most stunning landscapes in Glacier Park. But I have to tell you that there’s so much more to the Crown of the Continent than just driving the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

The tunnel on the west side of the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

The tunnel on the west side of the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

In an effort to help you get the most of your visit to Montana’s Glacier National Park, I’ve rounded up some of the park’s best hidden gems. 

1. Going-to-the-Sun Road. Okay, we all KNOW this is not a hidden gem, but the timing of when to drive it is indeed a hidden gem. My best advice: go early in the morning (as in be through the park entrance and on the road before 8 a.m.) or in late afternoon (we’re talking after 5 p.m). Most of the visitors to the road are hitting it during late morning, mid-day or afternoon and to be honest, the road gets really crowded during this time of day during July and August.

Taking in the view from a roadside pullout.

Taking in the view from a roadside pullout.

2. Take a boat tour at Rising Sun. While there are many places to take a guided tour with Glacier Park Boat Company in Glacier National Park, Rising Sun (located on the east side of the park on St. Mary Lake) is one of the lesser-visited destinations. Plus, this lake cruise is different from some of the others, due to the incredible landscapes and history of this side of the park.

Little Chief cruising on St. Mary Lake. Photo: Tyrel Johnson

Little Chief cruising on St. Mary Lake. Photo: Tyrel Johnson

3. Enjoy a cocktail at Many Glacier Hotel. Truth time: there’s limited lodging availability at Many Glacier Hotel during July and August, but don’t let that stop you from visiting this incredible place. Even if you’re not staying at the hotel, it’s well worth making the drive to the Many Glacier Valley and enjoying a cocktail (I recommend the huckleberry smash) on the massive deck that overlooks Swiftcurrent Lake.

Taking in the view of Swiftcurrent Lake.

Taking in the view of Swiftcurrent Lake.

4. Cruise the Going-to-the-Sun Road with Sun Tours. Offering three tours daily (two tours depart from the east side of Glacier Park , while one departs from the west side), Sun Tours provides an incredible look at the Backbone of the World from the perspective of the Blackfeet Tribe. For more photos of what to expect on a tour, check them out on instagram.
Sidenote: I’ve taken one of these tours and they are amazing! Not only do you get to sit back and soak in the beauty of the park, but it’s incredible to be able to learn about the park from Blackfeet tribal members. 

Views of Mount Oberlin, Birdwoman Basin and Mount Cannon. Photo: Sun Tours/Bear Star Photography

Views of Mount Oberlin, Birdwoman Basin and Mount Cannon. Photo: Sun Tours/Bear Star Photography

5. Visit Kintla Lake. It’s no secret that I love Polebridge and Bowman Lake, but if you want to explore a place that’s even more off-the-beaten-path than those two, head to Kintla Lake. While it’s located in the North Fork of the park and is fairly close to Polebridge and Bowman, it takes longer to get there which means one thing: fewer people. Plus, it’s beautiful.
Sidenote: the road out to Kintla Lake is pretty rugged, so be sure you have a high-clearance vehicle (SUV, truck, etc.) and take your time. 

Kintla Lake. Photo: Tim Rains/NPS

Kintla Lake. Photo: Tim Rains/NPS

Happy summer!

xo,
TT

Hello Glacier National Park (AKA for the Love, How is this Real Life)

Confession time: sometimes I wonder out loud to myself, “Is this real life?” Because you guys, I have to tell you that there are days where I legitimately wonder how in the world I’m in this exact spot at this exact moment to be able to experience this life.

This is my "REALLY LIFE?!" face. Or it's my "Don't cry because life really can be this good face." You decide.

This is my “REALLY LIFE?!” face. Or it’s my “I cannot believe this beautiful life” face. You decide. PS: sorry for this giant photo of me that’s currently staring you down from your computer/iPad/phone screen. 

Take for example, a recent afternoon spent in Glacier National Park.

The view of our destination: Glacier National Park.

The view of our destination: Glacier National Park.

I was traveling with a group of friends and we had a few free hours to explore the Crown of the Continent. Since it was the first trip to Montana and Glacier Park for most of them, we did what any group should do: we took a red bus tour and boat tour.

Our chariot AKA one of the historic red buses that provide tours in Glacier National Park.

Our chariot AKA one of the historic red buses that provide tours in Glacier National Park.

A required photo stop: the west entrance into Glacier National Park. PS: I'm currently obsessed with these shirts from Montana Shirt Company.

A required photo stop: the west entrance into Glacier National Park. PS: I’m currently obsessed with these shirts from Montana Shirt Company.

After stopping to take in one of the best views in the world (Lake McDonald from Apgar Village), our red bus driver Glenn took us along the Going-to-the-Sun Road to Lake McDonald Lodge for a guided boat tour with Glacier Park Boat Company on the DeSmet—a historic wooden boat that calls the waters of Lake McDonald home. And for 45 blissful minutes we cruised the waters of the park while taking in snow-capped mountain peaks and learned about the history of the boat company and this region of the park from the boat’s captain.

This view never gets old.

This view never gets old.

Getting ready to board the DeSmet.

Getting ready to board the DeSmet.

See ya soon, Lake McDonald Lodge.

See ya soon, Lake McDonald Lodge.

Pro tip: if given the chance, always take a photo with a park ranger.

Pro tip: if given the chance, always take a photo with a park ranger.

This little lady is one of my favorite travel buddies.

This little lady is one of my favorite travel buddies.

I'll cruise with you any day, DeSmet.

I’ll cruise with you any day, DeSmet.

Showing our love for Glacier National Park.

Showing our love for Glacier National Park.

Needless to say, it was a good day.

xo,
TT

Biking the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Montana’s Glacier National Park

You guys, I have to tell you something: riding Glacier National Park’s Going-to-the-Sun Road on a bike is one of the best things you could ever do.

Hello, you gorgeous thing.

Hello, you gorgeous thing.

Sure, parts of it are hard (at least it’s hard if your name starts with a T and ends with an -ia) and yes, you may wonder how in the world your legs can and will keep pedaling uphill as you slowly make the elevation climb from the valley floor toward the tunnel and up to the loop but I’m here—alive and well—to tell you that those things are well worth the experience of biking in one of the most beautiful places in the world—Glacier National Park.
Sidenote: while parts of this road may be difficult if you don’t bike regularly, it is totally doable and quite literally one of the best things I’ve ever personally done. 

A bit of backstory: in mid-May, I grabbed three new friends who were here exploring Western Montana’s Glacier Country and we headed for Glacier National Park with one mission and one mission only: to pedal our bikes up the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

You and me, baby. (And yes, apparently the bike is now my baby.)

You and me, baby. (And yes, apparently the bike is now my baby.)

And pedal we did. To sum it up in three words: it was awesome.

Here’s the other thing: I had done this before, back in the days of yesteryear, and I drive this road regularly. But there is nothing that compares to biking the road in spring when it’s just you, your bike and your riding companions making your way up the road before Glacier National Park opens it to vehicular traffic.

Take a look…

This view, and moment, is one I won't soon forget.

This view, and moment, is one I won’t soon forget.

Low-hanging clouds made this day even more magical.

Low-hanging clouds made the day even more magical.

Stopping for a moment to record this moment with friends. PS: don't mind the line on my forehead. The "one size fits all" helmets don't apply to this big-headed girl.

Stopping to record this moment with friends. PS: don’t mind the line on my forehead. The “one size fits all” helmets don’t apply to this big-headed girl. The good news? My head was very safe. 

This view during spring can only be seen by hikers and bikers on the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

This view during spring can only be seen by hikers and bikers on the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

For this Montana-lovin' girl, this is perfection.

For this Montana-lovin’ girl, this is perfection.

Heading back down the road through the tunnel.

Heading back down the road through the tunnel.

I had to stop time and time again to soak this experience in.

I had to stop time and time again to soak in this experience. 

Wind-swept hair + watery eyes ironically equal my perfect May day in Montana.

Wind-swept hair + watery eyes ironically equal my perfect May day in Montana.

If you want to bike in Glacier National Park, here are a few things to note:
-You can bring your own bike or rent one. If you’re renting, I recommend picking up a rental bike at Great Northern Cycle & Ski in Whitefish. While their whole team is fantastic (special shout out to Craig and Stella!), Willy gave our group incredible service and detailed explanations about our bikes when we picked them up.
-Plan to ride in spring before the road is open to car traffic.
-Take advantage of the brand new and free bike shuttle service. The biker shuttle runs daily from Apgar and Lake McDonald Lodge to Avalanche Creek now through June 26, 2016 or when the Going-to-the-Sun Road opens to vehicular traffic, whichever comes first.

xo,
TT

#PictureMontana + Celebrate America’s Best Idea: National Parks

For those of you keeping score, I’m sure that by now you know that I LOVE Montana. It’s just that this place that I call home has such a special spot in my heart and I can’t image loving anywhere quite as much as I love Montana’s big blue sky, dramatic temperatures, salt-of-the-earth residents and magical moments. It’s safe to say that I’m totally obsessed and love sharing my Montana with all of you!

Taking in the view of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Photo: Mills Wilderness Adventures

Taking in the view of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Photo: Mills Wilderness Adventures

And, because I’m a lover (and not a fighter) of Montana and Glacier National Park, I’m really excited to be celebrating the centennial of the National Park Service this year. In fact, I’m so excited about the 100 year anniversary that I got together with some folks who love our national parks almost as much as me (just kidding: I think we’re currently tied in our love for the parks) to really kick off this summer in style. My partners in Montana-lovin’ crime: Expedia.

My pals over at Expedia love national parks so much that they’ve actually partnered with Brand USA to sponsor the movie National Parks Adventure, made by filmmaker Greg MacGillivray and narrated by Robert Redford. Sidenote: swoon. And the best news: the movie premieres February 12, 2016 and is (most likely) coming to a theater near you soon.

And while I’m excited about the movie (word on the street is that my boo Glacier National Park makes a cameo in the film), I’m really excited for what else Expedia is doing: they’re sending their team of viewfinders to the top 10 national parks in the United States. Um, pretty awesome right?

Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Grand Canyon national parks. Photo: NPS flickr

Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Grand Canyon national parks. Photo: NPS flickr

But you know what’s even more awesome? Expedia is bringing their entire Viewfinder team to Montana this May and will be exploring Western Montana’s Glacier Country on an epic #PictureMontana road trip. And y’all are invited to come along!

This girl is THIS excited for #PictureMontana!

This girl is THIS excited for #PictureMontana!

Starting May 13 and ending May 20, we’ll be hitting the road (and if you can believe, it, I get to road trip with them!) and exploring this corner of Montana with highlights that include Missoula, the Mission Mountains, Flathead Lake, Whitefish and Glacier National Park. Simply follow the hashtags #PictureMontana and #GlacierMT on instagram and twitter during the third week in May for a peek into Western Montana.

A few other things to note:
-Passion Passport and Expedia are giving away a trip to Glacier National Park!
-Mark your calendars and catch a showing of National Parks Adventure when it comes to an IMAX theater near you. PS: Montana, it’s playing in West Yellowstone on May 1.
-For more information about #PictureMontana, be sure to follow us at @GlacierMT on instagram and twitter and connect with us on facebook here.
-Join the celebration of our country’s national parks by using #FindYourPark to share your memories or favorite moments in national parks on social media.
-Join us on May 18, 2016, in West Glacier for a “Happy Birthday, National Park Service” party. We’ll be sure to share more details as we finalize party plans.

Looking forward to exploring Montana and celebrating our national parks with all of you!

xo,
TT

A Perfect Day on the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park

Happy anniversary. In case you’ve forgotten, we’ve been together five years now. Can you believe that? During the last five years, I’ve told you stories while you’ve shared your memories with me about a place we both love: Montana. And by now, I’m sure you know that I’m head over heels for Montana and Glacier National Park. During our time together, I’ve learned a few things. One is that it’s important to tell the stories that  make my heart happy. So, in celebration of my five years of sharing a place I love so dearly I have one more story to tell you. It’s about a perfect day I had on Glacier National Park’s Going-to-the-Sun Road.

Read on…
I take a deep breath and pinch myself. I’m traveling north from Missoula to Glacier National Park on Highway 93 and I’ve just been greeted by the jagged snow-covered peaks of the Mission Mountains near St. Ignatius. This view has met me countless times as I’ve made the journey north, yet it always strikes me as being one of the most beautiful sites in the world.

Cresting Ravalli Hill, this view of the Mission Mountains greeted me.

Cresting Ravalli Hill, this view of the Mission Mountains met me.

As a lifelong Montanan, it seems that by now I’d be used to the scenic beauty of the state that I call home. But even after 30+ years of living in Big Sky Country, the jaw-dropping views that are found around every corner of this place never cease to amaze me. During my growing-up-years on the Rocky Mountain Front, the western corridor of the state seemed so far away. After all, to access these fertile valleys, I would have had to travel over the mountains. And to a five-year-old girl, that meant actually driving straight through the mountains. In my mind, it couldn’t be nearly as simple as cresting the Continental Divide at Roger’s Pass near Lincoln and traveling west along Highway 200.

Sawtooth Mountain on the Rocky Mountain Front.

Sawtooth Mountain on the Rocky Mountain Front. When I was five, I thought we had to drive straight over this mountain to get to Western Montana.

As I continue north, the next view that greets me at the top of Polson Hill is Flathead Lake—the largest natural freshwater lake in the West. At Polson, I take the road less traveled and head around the east side of the lake on Highway 35. My speed slows down as I meander along the shore of the lake and take in the view of countless cherry orchards before settling my gaze on the immense lake to the west.

Flathead Lake from the top of Polson Hill.

Flathead Lake from the top of Polson Hill.

One of my favorite road trip snacks: Flathead cherries.

One of my favorite road trip snacks: Flathead cherries.

The miles tick by as I continue north toward my destination: Glacier National Park.

Beargrass in Glacier National Park. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Beargrass in Glacier National Park. Photo: Donnie Sexton

When I was younger, my family spent part of every summer in Glacier National Park where we hiked, camped, played in ice-cold waterfalls and marveled at the size of the historic lodges. And while I’m no longer the little towheaded girl that’s missing my two front teeth, the park is a place that still stops me in my tracks.

Enjoying lunch on the Going-to-the-Sun Road as a little missy.

Enjoying lunch on the Going-to-the-Sun Road as a little miss.

Today, I pull my car off of Highway 2 and drive into the quaint community of West Glacier, crossing the Middle Fork of the Flathead River en route to the park. Before entering the park’s west entrance, I’m taken aback by the teal waters of the Middle Fork. Many of the waterways in the park (including the Middle Fork and McDonald Creek) have a distinct color that is created from glacial runoff. My first stop—Apgar—is located a mere two-minute drive from the park’s west entrance gate. Here, in this quaint village nestled at the southern end of Lake McDonald, I dip my toes into the crystal clear waters of the park’s largest lake.

The view of Lake McDonald from Apgar Village.

The view of Lake McDonald from Apgar Village.

"Fueling" up on huckleberry ice cream at Eddy's Cafe in Apgar Village.

“Fueling” up on huckleberry ice cream at Eddy’s Cafe in Apgar Village.

After my customary stop in Apgar Village, I navigate my way further into the heart of the park, piloting the car along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. As the miles tick away under my tires on this 50-mile-long road (it’s an engineering marvel and National Historic Landmark), I think about the builders that spent years laboring here and creating something that allowed visitors to see some of the most stunning scenery in the continental United States. Slowly but surely, I continue on past Lake McDonald Lodge before cruising through a forest of ancient red cedars, steadily gaining elevation as the road curves at “The Loop” and past the Weeping Wall before making a stop at Logan Pass and its Visitor Center. Along the way, I’m greeted by three mountain goats—two adults and a kid—that are often seen just below Logan Pass.

Climbing up toward "The Loop" from the west side.

Climbing up toward “The Loop” from the west side.

The view from Logan Pass.

The view from Logan Pass.

Looking toward Wild Goose Island on St. Mary Lake.

Looking toward Wild Goose Island on St. Mary Lake.

After a short hike in the shadow of Reynolds Mountain among wildflowers, the trip travels onward toward St. Mary. As the car hugs the road and sharp drop-offs and alpine valleys come into view, the terrain continues to change as elevation is lost. Dropping into Two Dog Flats, a starkly different topography of the park comes alive with wider meadows and grasslands. Before exiting the park, I stop at the St. Mary Visitor Center and wander out to take in the view. For a moment in time, I’m given a glimpse into what Montana’s First Nations may have seen and felt when they lived in the park millennia ago. It’s a place of sacred beauty; a land that seems almost otherworldly.

Blackfeet dancers in St. Mary.

Blackfeet dancers in St. Mary.

Vowing to capture this moment and feeling in my memory forever, the road trip continues on back to the west entrance of the park. While the easiest drive is taking Highway 89 to Browning before picking up Highway 2 to East Glacier Park, the adventurer in me opts for Highway 49 between Kiowa and East Glacier Park. Also known as Looking Glass Highway, this route provides stunning views of both the Blackfeet Nation and the Two Medicine Valley and has an entry point into Two Medicine.

The view into Glacier National Park's Two Medicine Valley from Looking Glass Highway.

The view into Glacier National Park’s Two Medicine Valley from Looking Glass Highway.

While Two Medicine used to be one of the busiest areas in Glacier (prior to the building of the Going-to-the-Sun Road), today it’s one of the quietest areas of the park and one that I often retreat to. Before catching the evening boat tour on Two Medicine Lake with Glacier Park Boat Company, I make the quick hike to Running Eagle Falls. Also known as “Trick Falls,” this waterfall is actually made up of two separate falls and was named after a female Blackfeet warrior.

Running Eagle Falls.

Running Eagle Falls.

As my mind takes in the importance of this area of the park, I travel west with the setting sun and think back on today in all its perfection. Because to me, any day in Glacier National Park is perfect. May we all find a place that makes our hearts whole, happy and at home.

xo, TT

Glacier Park Lodge Celebrates 100 Years

Every now and again, we stumble upon something magical. A place that fills you with wonder and leaves you wishing you could hear the stories it has to tell. For me, one of those places is Glacier Park Lodge.

Growing up on the Rocky Mountain Front, each year my family would venture up to Glacier National Park for our annual summer outing. I have distinct memories of pulling up to the lodge and having my eyes—which already took up half of my face when I was a little miss—become even bigger upon seeing this beautiful building.

Glacier Park Lodge in East Glacier, Montana.

Glacier Park Lodge in East Glacier, Montana.

While we stayed at the lodge countless times, one memory has stayed with me like it was yesterday. One night, when I was supposed to be in bed sleeping like an angel, I snuck out of our room—clad with wild blond hair and a long white nightgown—to peer over the railing from the third floor balcony. I listened in amazement as the piano, accompanied by melodies from a group of singers, filled the timber-built structure.

For many summers when we were just little tots, I traveled to Glacier National Park with these two. (We let our father and stepmom come too).

My Glacier National Park traveling buddies. (Don’t worry, we let OMR and our stepmom come too).

This year, the grand lodge is marking its 100th year. Built in 1912 – 1913, Glacier Park Lodge was constructed from 60 timbers (Douglas fir and cedars that were hauled from the Pacific Northwest) and was given the moniker “Omahkoyis” or “Big Tree Lodge” by the Blackfeet Tribe. And while it officially opened its doors on June 15, 1913, a grand opening celebration was held on June 22, 1913, making this year its 100th birthday.

And what better way to celebrate a birthday than with a party.

Photo courtesy Glacier Park, Inc.

Photo courtesy Glacier Park, Inc.

The lobby of Glacier Park Lodge, now and then.

The lobby of Glacier Park Lodge, now and then.

On Saturday, June 22 the public is invited to attend Glacier Park Lodge’s Centennial Birthday Celebration. Taking place from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., the festivities will kick off with a rededication ceremony that includes special guests Ron Cadrette (GM for Glacier Park, Inc.), J.J. Hill (descendant of Louis Hill, the builder of Glacier Park Lodge and Many Glacier Hotel) and Chief Earl Old Person from the Blackfeet Tribe. Following the rededication, the afternoon will be filled with photo booth fun, cotton candy, live music, a free BBQ and birthday cake.

Happy birthday, Glacier Park Lodge. May you have many, many more.

xo,
TT

PS: As an added bonus, Glacier Park, Inc. has created a Glacier Park Lodge desktop calendar for free download.

One Day in Glacier National Park

This girl spend her Wednesday in Glacier National Park driving the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

The best part?

Hmmm…I’m not sure if it was the nice gate lady at West Glacier (happy and friendly–a great way to start a day in the park), cruising 50 miles through the heart of Glacier with the window down, admiring the colorful wildflowers, visiting with folks at Logan Pass and on the Great Lodges of Glacier Tour, perusing the educational displays at the St. Mary Visitor Center or simply reveling in the absolute majesty of what the Blackfeet Nation calls the “Backbone of the World.”

The first stop of my day.

Climbing up the road.

Stopped for construction...not a bad view. 😉

6,646 feet

Logan Pass

Sunrift Gorge. One of my favorite places in Glacier.

Proof I was there!

The view of Wild Goose Island.

Any way you slice it, I was exactly where I was supposed to be.

TT

A Trip to Glacier National Park & Whitefish

A few weeks ago, we rounded up some friends from Montana and across the country and made our way to Glacier National Park. The group was a tad nervous, as the skies and forecast really seemed to want to put a damper on our fun time. But we were a stalwart bunch and couldn’t be deterred.

We grabbed our beanies, down jackets, rain gear and headed northeast to the community of East Glacier. Having grown up just two hours south of East Glacier, I spent quite a bit of time there during the summers when I was just a little blond bundle.

While I looked forward to staying at Glacier Park Lodge when I was younger, I think I look forward to it even more today. It reminds me of a simpler time…when my hair was always messy, my gap was even bigger (I managed to knock out my front teeth when I was younger) and summer vacation was greeted with open arms, excited anticipation and big plans.

Today, going to the lodge is much the same. I look forward to each visit with a touch of giddiness that remains with me, even as the years pass by.

During this visit, we were able to take a red bus tour with perhaps the cutest jammer driver of all time: Jammer Joe.

Jammer Joe

He chauffeured our group to St. Mary, Jackson Glacier Overlook and Two Medicine, regaling us with history of the park, tales of the past and his sweet voice as it crooned a few country songs.

Two Medicine, Glacier National Park

After two days in East Glacier, we headed to our next destination on the west side of the park, the appropriately named community of West Glacier. We met up with a friend of mine, Ryan, at Glacier Outdoor Center and were given fly-fishing lessons for the next few hours. Two of the folks in my group landed fish…and while I didn’t catch a fish, I did land a tree.

Connor and Andrija perfecting a cast

After an evening in West Glacier and a morning hike with Glacier Guides, we rafted the Middle Fork of the Flathead River with Great Northern Whitewater Raft & Resort on waters that are best described as epic, fun and offering a kick-in-the-pants good time.

From there, we drove the short 30 minutes to Whitefish where we checked into The Lodge at Whitefish Lake. The next morning we headed up to Whitefish Mountain Resort for the 6-zip line tour. For our first zip, we were greeted with rain. And while it kept us company for the remainder of the morning, the zip line tour was an absolute delight!

We heart zip lining

Fog covered the mountain on a few of the lines…the longest coming in at 1,900′ and as zippers, you couldn’t see the landing platform until you were almost upon it after coming out of the fog. And to be honest, we didn’t mind the fog. It added to the excitement of each line and our determination to beat our zipping partner to the platform.

We ended back at the base lodge, where we dried off and relaxed after our adrenaline, giggle, race-filled morning.

After zipping, we headed back to town where we split up, with some biking The Whitefish Trail and others taking advantage of a break in the clouds by paddling a canoe on Whitefish Lake. As this was the last day of our journey together, we headed to McGarry’s Roadhouse for a delicious dinner, followed by several helpings of dessert.

Paddling Whitefish Lake

To my traveling partners, you were such a delight! If ever I have to spend five days in the pouring rain, complete with gray skies, I hope once again that trip will be taken with you.

Hope to see you in Montana again, soon. Until then, happy trails.

TT

Combining Glacier, Adventure and Showers

There is something I need to tell you. And it’s something that this little missy is excited about…Glacier Park, Inc. is launching a new tour for summer 2011!

 

But that’s not all…the description for the Great Glacier Adventure says, “WANTED in 2011: Adventurous hiking and rafting enthusiasts whose idea of camping is staying and dining in historic motor inns and lodges.”

I think this tour may have been designed just for me.

Now don’t get me wrong, I love camping in the great outdoors under Montana’s starry big sky because a) it’s beautiful and b) I’m a Montana girl – I better love it!

But given the option, I’m going to lean toward staying in a historic lodge/motor inn. Not only are the lodges beautiful, but they have showers. And after a day cruising in red buses, hiking with Glacier Wilderness Guides and whitewater rafting with Glacier Raft Company, that sounds pretty good to me.

Great Glacier Adventure!

TT

For more information on the Great Glacier Adventure, click here.